Prof. Anton Hagenbeek

Executive Steering Committee Member

University of Amsterdam

Professor Anton Hagenbeek received his M.D. degree from the Erasmus University in Rotterdam. He was trained in experimental hematology in the Radiobiological Institute T.N.O. in Rijswijk where he obtained his Ph.D. in 1977 and was, after training in clinical hematology in Rotterdam, Prof. Hagenbeek obtained a fellowship in hematology at U.C.L.A.

He then worked as a staff member of the Dr Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center in Rotterdam, Department of Hematology from 1982 until 1997, and was in charge of the autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplantation program there between 1987 and 1994.

In 1993 Prof. Hagenbeek was appointed Professor of Clinical and Experimental Hemato-Oncology, at the Erasmus University, Rotterdam. His main research interests are in developmental therapeutics for leukemia, focusing on translational research from preclinical animal models and in vitro studies to clinical application. From studies on minimal residual disease and experimental bone marrow transplantation (GVHD-GVL) in the early 1980s, he has now moved into immuno-gene therapy of hematological malignancies. His clinical research activities are mainly in the field of (intergroup) studies in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Additionally, Prof. Hagenbeek has worked on developmental therapeutics for leukemia, focusing on translational research from preclinical animal models and in-vitro studies to clinical application.

He has (co-)authored 335 papers in peer-reviewed journals. In 1997, he was appointed Professor of Hematology at the University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands. Since 2006 he holds a joined appointment as Professor of Hematology in the Department of Hematology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

Postions of responsibility/awards:

- International Consortium on developing new biological prognosis indices in lymphoma
- International Consortium on first-in-man phase I/II studies with new agents in lymphomas and CLL